1
2
3
4
5

CURRENT EXHIBITION ~ CREATING THE CONTEMPORARY CHAIR

MARCH - NOVEMBER 2017 ~ NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA

During Melbourne Design Week 2017, the Chinaman’s File Rocking Chair, designed for Broached Commissions, is on show at the National Gallery of Victoria, as part of the ‘Creating the Contemporary Chair’ exhibition, curated by the NGV‘s Department of Contemporary Design and Architecture.

Chinaman’s File is a rocking chair designed for the roughly 16500 Chinese gold diggers who walked from Robe in South Australia to the Victorian gold fields during the mid 19th Century.

“To reach the gold fields, they would load the heavier equipment onto drays, for the trek could be several hundred kilometers. The Chinese men would travel on foot in single file, each carrying supplies in two baskets hanging from the ends of a long pole over their shoulders. Each man could carry up to 78 kilograms – more than their average body weight” (Hill, 2010, Page 116)

Because of these unusual processions, ‘single file’ became known as ‘Chinaman’s File’ during this period.

These men were economic nomads, moving from digging to digging in the search of their fortune. During these grueling journeys across a forbidding and alien countryside it is likely that these men would have longed for the comforts of home – familiar food, familiar domesticity, the welcoming embrace of a mother, or the irreplaceable touch of a lover.

Chinaman’s File Rocking Chair was designed to simulate the rock experienced by a baby while being walked by its mother: each rock of the chair is designed to subject the user to the same arc and cadence that a baby experiences during its mother’s single step. In theory this action will produce a feeling of contentment that we have not felt since our infancy.

Creating the Contemporary Chair presents arresting and provocative chair designs by some of the most interesting Australian and international designers practising in recent decades. Comprising thirty-five new acquisitions supported by Gordon Moffatt AM, this exhibition explores the significance of chairs as markers of design evolution and as objects embedded with meaning, expression, experimentation and utility. Works on display range in date from 1980 to 2016 and include examples of both mass-produced and studio-created chairs sourced from around the globe.

Where
NGV International
180 St Kilda Road,
Melbourne, Victoria

Exhibition dates
March – November 2017

Open
10am – 5pm daily

Image Credit – S.C. Brees and National Gallery of Victoria

www.ngv.vic.gov.au

www.broachedcommissions.com

1
4__neville_sukhia
12__neville_sukhia
4__neville_sukhia
9__neville_sukhia
8__neville_sukhia
1
5__neville_sukhia

CURRENT EXHIBITION ~ DESIGNWORK 01

14 MARCH – 1 APRIL 2017 ~ SOPHIE GANNON GALLERY, MELBOURNE

During Melbourne Design Week 2017, some of the pieces developed as part of Mumbai Porosity Kabari 2016, will be on show at Sophie Gannon Gallery, as part of the ‘Designwork 01’ exhibition.

Porosity Kabari was an interdisciplinary,
cross-cultural, collaborative project whereby
architect/artist Professor Richard Goodwin and I, worked with Indian artist/designer/writer Ishan Khosla and students from Parsons University, Mumbai.

The project challenged we three designers to
collaborate in Mumbai’s ‘Chor Bazaar’ (thieves market) and Columbia University‘s Studio X, using the bazaar as our only source of materials and making processes.

In the bazaar, we learned from spontaneous
conversation and experimentation with the vendors and crafts people working in this manic market place. Conversely, Studio X afforded us a space for considered discussion and precise prototyping, in the development of refined ideas to be taken back into the bazaar.

The sculptural furniture objects created in
Mumbai’s Chor Bazaar and Studio X formed the Porosity Kabari Exhibition. This exhibition was presented to the culturally diverse audiences of India, by Columbia University’s Studio X in Mumbai.

Designwork 01 will be the first time that some of the results of Porosity Kabari have been shown in Australia. Works on show include ‘Jugaad with Pottery’, ‘Jugaad with Car Parts’ and ‘Dropping a Kumbhar Wala Matka’.

Where
Sophie Gannon Gallery
2 Albert Street,
Richmond, Victoria.

Exhibition dates
14 March – 1 April 2017

Open
Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm or by appointment

Image Credit – Neville Sukhia

INQUIRE

2
8
2
7
3
5
4
12
9
10
6
14
11
13
15

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ BROACHED MONSTERS BY TRENT JANSEN

17 FEBRUARY - 19 MARCH 2017 ~ CRITERIA COLLECTION, MELBOURNE

Prior to colonisation Australia was imagined, in the northern hemisphere, as a vast southern landmass … and little else was factually known. Fabulous creatures, of incredible proportions and improbable anatomy, filled the void of knowledge.

Fear of these creatures was legitimised when early British colonists started to learn of the frightful monsters in Aboriginal folklore. This fear of what lurked in the unknown fathoms of Australian bush land soon became a point of cultural confluence for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Over 5 years of research and design investigation Trent Jansen recreated two creatures that represent both Indigenous and non-Indigenous vernaculars – Pankalangu and the Hairy Wild Man From Botany Bay – suggesting these conflating myths as central figures for a national mythology that is inclusive of both cultures.

Broached Commissions was co-founded by Lou Weis & Vincent Aiello.

Commissioner – Broached Commissions

Materials Pankalangu Wardrobe and Side Table – Lamination bent plywood, Queensland walnut, copper and brass

Materials Pankalangu Arm Chair – Plywood, stainless steel, Tasmanian wallaby pelt, copper, polyurethane foam and French leather

Materials Pankalangu Bowl – Tasmanian wallaby pelt, aluminium and New Zealand leather

Materials Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay Chandelier – Clear blown glass, smoked float glass, silicone, stainless steel and cable assembly

Materials Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay Chaise Lounge – Icelandic sheep skin, New Zealand leather, plywood, American walnut and polyurethane foam

Materials Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay Bowl – Icelandic sheep skin, aluminium and New Zealand leather

Production – Sydney, Illawarra, Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia

Makers – Trent Jansen Studio, Luke Coleman, Adam Price, Chris Nicholson, Peter Stapelton, Boris and Mariana Emilio, Jeremy Lepisto and Ben Edols

Image Credit – Dan Hocking

INQUIRE

1
2
3
4

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ AT HOME

11 NOVEMBER 2016 - 22 JANUARY 2017 ~ OLD GOVERNMENT HOUSE, PARRAMATTA

At Home is curated by Australian design expert David Clark to showcase objects from some of Australia’s leading contemporary designers alongside the significant Georgian furniture collection of Old Government House.

At Home celebrates the uniqueness of Australian design. Spanning almost 200 years, the objects on display throughout the House invite visitors to consider the past, present and future of Australian furniture and interior design.

Works on Show – Pregnant Chair, Jugaad With Car Parts, Sign Stool Limited Edition, Jugaad With Pottery Vessels, Sign Stool 450 and Briggs Family Tea Service.

Image Credit – Michael Wee

Curator – David Clark

Supporters – National Trust

1
3

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ OBJECT THERAPY

14 - 30 OCTOBER 2016 ~ HOTEL HOTEL, CANBERRA

Object Therapy was part of the Hotel Hotel Fix and Make program, culminating in an exhibition of 30 broken objects that underwent therapy – treated and creatively repaired by a designer or artist. The exhibition opened at Hotel Hotel from 14-30 October, 2016.

Object Therapy was designed to encourage us to rethink our consumption patterns and re-evaluate the broken objects that surround us. It explores the role of repair in our society and its possibilities.

This project was developed by Dr. Guy Keulemans of the University of New South Wales, Niklavs Rubenis of the Australian National University and Andy Marks, and is an investigation into the culture of transformative repair as practiced by local, interstate and international artists and designers.

Trent Jansen Studio was assigned Teena Harkins’ beautifully nostalgic 1970s washing trolley. We viewed this object as a beacon of the Australian Dream, whereby every Australian family could aspire to own a backyard so large that one would require a trolley just to transport wet clothes from the fibro laundry at the back of the house, to the Hills Hoist planted dead in the centre of the yard. This was not a time of medium density living – washing machines were not squeezed in next to dishwashers in the kitchen, nor was it a time of recycled plastic, injection moulded clothes pegs.

We transformed Teena’s 1970s washing trolley into a collection of clothes pegs of the archetype used during this period, as a reminder that the quintessential Australian Dream is a thing of the past, a bygone component of an ever evolving culture. The relinquishment of the quarter acre block, the washing trolley, the Hills Hoist and the archetypal timber clothes peg is proof that Australia is a culture in flux, just like all other cultures at all times in human history.

Manufacture – Trent Jansen Studio

Materials – Used washing trolley

Production – Sydney and Illawarra, Australia

Image Credit – Lee Grant

15__pete_daly
14__pete_daly

NEW WORK ~ NUPTIAL FLOOR LAMP

DESIGN BY THEM

The Nuptial Floor Lamp was designed as a sustainable piece of lighting, aiming to be involved in a lasting personal relationship with its owner, fostered by the human characteristics that this piece possesses. This piece hopes to play an important roll in the life of its owner, thus becoming sustainable instead of disposable.

The Nuptial Floor Lamp communicates the bond that exists between two people that have been together for a very long time. Like an elderly couple that have spent their lives together, just as in love as the day they met.

The Nuptial Floor Lamp is two identical, cotton lampshades that appear to have been fused together as life-long companions.

Manufacture – DesignByThem

Materials – Styrene, steel, cotton and cable assembly

Production – Sydney, Australia

Image Credit – Pete Daly

SHOP

7__haydn_cattach
2

NEW WORK ~ TIDAL SUN LOUNGE

TAIT

For many, surf culture is a quintessential aspect of a uniquely Australian lifestyle. The beach conjures memories of summer holidays and the freedom of long days spent by the ocean, exploring with friends and family before returning to the campsite, with third degree sunburn. On days like these we learned how to spot a rip, squirt cungie, and monitor the relentless cycle of the tide. These lessons begin when we are children and continue into adulthood, shaping our intuition and forging a resolute respect for the beauty and treachery of the ocean.

The Tidal Sun Lounge was designed to represent these quintessentially Australian experiences. This piece draws on wave diagrams and the nostalgia of childhood, beachside holidays, in the design of a stainless steel wire sun lounge, made for use by the pool or ocean.

The Tidal Sun Lounge was designed based on the thick, laid back wave at the back of the set, transforming this ephemeral form, created by the tide and the shore, into a sculptural, functional object.

Manufacture – Tait

Materials – Stainless steel, outdoor foam and outdoor textile

Production – Melbourne, Australia

Image Credit – Haydn Cattach

SHOP