CURRENT EXHIBITION ~ POROSITY KABARI

18 OCTOBER - 1 DECEMBER 2019 ~ HAWKESBURY REGIONAL GALLERY, WINDSOR

On 18 October 2019 Hawkesbury Regional Gallery will open the Porosity Kabari exhibition, with works from Ishan Khosla, Richard Goodwin and I, designed and made in Mumbai’s Chor Bazaar and Dharavi. This is the last time Porosity Kabari will be shown before we begin planning for Porosity Kabari II, so please head along and see the show.

I am interested in the Australian philosophy of make do – to do your best with what you have. Jugaad is the Indian make do, with a slight twist. Jugaad is doing just enough with what you have, and it is also figuring it out as you go ~ improvising, rather than planning the direction forward. You can see this philosophy in action everywhere in India: From the way that people cross the street ~ stepping off the footpath and meandering through the traffic in whichever direction provides a free path; to high-rise construction ~ steel reinforcement protrudes from half built skyscrapers all over this country. It seems that these projects will be finished when there is the time and/or money to do so.

For me, the Chor Bazaar and Porosity Kabari are all about jugaad, and this has made me a little nervous. I am used to researching projects thoroughly and working through production processes in a very controlled manner, but with the design and production for Porosity Kabari happening in just three weeks, who has time for planning or control. Most days during this project we would head into the bazaar or Dharavi and observe the makers who work in these hubs of industry. We observed and then we reacted, generating ideas by improvising forms based on those that were possible, using the techniques and/or materials that we saw. We also improvised our way through the making process, as options, problems or questions arose, we suggested the best immediate solution that came to mind.

Where
Hawkesbury Regional Gallery,
300 George Street,
Windsor, NSW

Exhibition dates
18 October – 1 December 2019

Supporters
Hawkesbury Regional Gallery
UNSW Art & Design
Columbia University – Studio X
Parsons Mumbai

Image Credit – Neville Sukhia

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ GALLERY SALLY DAN-CUTHBERT

12 - 15 SEPTEMBER 2019 ~ SYDNEY CONTEMPORARY, CARRIAGE WORKS, SYDNEY

Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert presents the latest collaboration between Johnny Nargoodah and I at Sydney Contemporary, Carriage Works, Sydney.

This work is collaborative, so I can only provide my point of view on the process and inspiration governing the work.

From my point of view, this project is an experiment in the generation of hybrid material culture. Material Culture Theory says that the artefacts we make embody the values, ideas, attitudes and assumptions (the culture) of the maker and designer. But what if an artefact is made and/or designed collaboratively by two people from different cultures? Does this artefact exhibit the cultural values of both authors? If so, how do these cultural values manifest?

I am also interested in experimenting with and ultimately inventing new methods for ethical, symmetrical cross-cultural collaboration. Johnny and I have worked together on two projects before, and we have tried many different ways of working together, always endeavouring to ensure that the process by which we collaborate generates an outcomes that is symmetrical in its co-authorship. In an endeavour to evenly contribute to our projects we experiment with methods including ‘sketch exchange’ and ‘designing by making’.

From a technical and formal perspective, I am interested in idiosyncrasy, and love the unpredictable geometry that comes from ramming and crumpling a material like metal. In this chair, the geometry of the crumple is softened through the application of leather. Leather has been formative in the working lives of both Johnny and I: Johnny worked as a cattle station saddler in the Kimberley region, using traditional techniques to form leather; on the other-hand, I have experimented broadly with animal pelts of many kinds. Untitled is taking shape through experimentation with leather forming processes across the incongruent knowledge and skill in leather working held by Johnny and I, using a combination of traditional, industrial and highly unorthodox methods, in the pursuit of new practices in this medium.

Also on show with Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert during Sydney Contemporary are the Sign Stool Limited Edition (2004) and Jugaad with Car Parts (2016).

Where
Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert,
Booth E11, Sydney Contemporary,
Carriageworks, Sydney.

Exhibition Dates
12 – 15 September 2019

Supporters
Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert
Mangkaja Arts
UNSW Art & Design
Australia Council for the Arts
Sydney Contemporary

Image credit – Abraham Markos

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ INTRODUCING GALLERY SALLY DAN-CUTHBERT

8 AUGUST - 22 SEPTEMBER 2019 ~ GALLERY SALLY DAN-CUTHBERT, RUSHCUTTERS BAY

I am excited that Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert will be representing me in Sydney. Opening in August 2019, Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert will be a unique collection of limited edition and one-off design pieces from Australia and New Zealand, exhibited alongside artworks by some of the country’s leading visual artists.

Sally Dan-Cuthbert is a Sydney art consultant with a prominent list of artists and private and corporate collectors as her clients. After more than 30 years working in fine arts, Sally has shifted her focus to include functional art and contemporary design.

Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert will curate and exhibit solo and mixed shows by emerging, mid-career and senior artists and designers, and demonstrate the importance of living with art and design together.

The gallery’s first exhibition – which opens on the 8th August 2019 – is a group showing of 20 artists and will include our Collision Collection, designed in collaboration with Johnny Nargoodah from Mangkaja Arts in Fitzroy Crossing for Fremantle Arts Centre’s In Cahoots. We will be showing alongside designers including Michael Gittings, Guy Keulemans, Kyo Hashimoto and Darren Fry, and visual artists such as Marion Borgelt, Jacky Redgate, Sally Smart and Makiko Ruyijin.

Where
Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert.
20 McLachlan Avenue,
Rushcutters Bay

Exhibition Dates
9 August – 22 September 2019

Supporters
Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert
Mangkaja Arts
Fremantle Arts Centre
UNSW Art & Design

Image credit – Gallery Sally Dan-Cuthbert and Fremantle Arts Centre

ACQUISITION ~ JANGARRA ARMCHAIR

JULY 2019 ~ NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA

The 1st edition of the Jangarra Armchair for Fremantle Arts Centre has been acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria.

Thanks to Ewan McEoin, Simone LeAmon and Myf Doughty for selecting this work to join the prestigious permanent collection of this great public institution.

Thanks also to Lou Weis and Broached Commissions for including this work in the Design Storytellers exhibition at the NGV in 2018.

“I like the armchair, it’s a proper Jangarra ngurra, the Jangarra could hide behind that one. It’s ok that someone might have that in their home as furniture, it’s an easy story they can understand, don’t you think?”
– Rita Minga, collaborator from Mangkaja Arts in Fitzroy Crossing.

The Jangarra Armchair was designed by Rita Minga, Johnny Nargoodah, Trent Jansen, and Wes Maselli, and made in two locations very far apart; Fitzroy Crossing in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia, and the Wollongong region on the east coast of New South Wales.

According to Rita’s accounts, Jangarra is known colloquially as the ‘man killer’. A large, hairy man who carries a boomerang and a shield, Jangarra (or, ‘that Jangarra-bloke’) is known to crouch down and hide behind large rocks and anthills, observing his prey from this hidden position in the landscape.

Rita recalls being told the story of Jangarra as a child by the old people at night, around the campfire: “They told us not to go close to the big mungku, the big anthills, because it was Jangarra ngurra, the home of that big man, Jangarra. As kids we’d go a long way hunting for a goanna, we’d dig under the small anthills but not the large ones, afraid of this man who might hurt us.”

Makers
Gene Tighe, Elsie Dickens, Duane Shaw, Illiam Nargoodah, Mayarn Lawford, Eva Nargoodah and Yangkarni Penny K-Lyons.

Supporters
National Gallery of Victoria
Broached Commissions
Mangkaja Arts
Fremantle Arts Centre
UNSW Art & Design
Australia Council for the Arts

Image credits – Fremantle Arts Centre

ACQUISITION ~ BRIGGS FAMILY TEA SERVICE

JULY 2019 ~ NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA

The 5th (and final) edition of the Briggs Family Tea Service for Broached Commissions has been acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria.

Thanks to Ewan McEoin, Simone LeAmon and Myf Doughty for selecting this work to join the prestigious permanent collection of this great public institution.

Thanks also to Lou Weis and Broached Commissions for including this work in the Design Storytellers exhibition at the NGV in 2018.

The Briggs Family Tea Service aims to represent a family that was forged and defined by the turbulent nature of Van Diemens Land during the early years of colonisation. This family depicts a microcosm of the many varied aspects of the colonial and Aboriginal relationships that were being forced and forged throughout Australia during this period of our history.

A tea-pot and sugar bowl represent the parents, George Briggs of Dunstable in Bedfordshire and Woretermoeteyenner of the Pairrebeenne people of North East Van Diemen’s Land. The physical characteristics of these two objects are defined by the hybrid life that Briggs and Woretermoeteyenner were forced to adopt in order to survive the cultural collision that affected Van Diemen’s Land in the early days of a new British colony.

Makers
Rod Bamford, Vicki West and Oliver Smith.

Supporters
National Gallery of Victoria
Broached Commissions
UNSW Art & Design
Australia Council for the Arts

Image credits – Scotty Cameron

 

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ CONTINENTAL SHIFT : CONTEMPORARY ART AND SOUTH ASIA

22 JUNE - 22 SEPTEMBER 2019 ~ BUNJIL PLACE, NARRE WARREN

Continental Shift: Contemporary Art and South Asia presents the work of 14 Australian and Internationally based artists who were either born in, descended from or have an on-going connection to South Asia. Some of these artists form part of a diaspora that has taken people from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Afghanistan to all corners of the globe. Others have been lured to South Asia to explore their personal connections with people, culture and place.

A range of ideas and themes are considered in this exhibition including social and cultural displacement, multi-racial identities, the importance of family and place in the creative process, and how collaborative ways of working can effect political change.

Featured artists include Khadim Ali, Kate Beynon, Michael Candy, Peter Drew, Richard Goodwin, Trent Jansen & Ishan Khosla, Reena Saini Kallat, Shivanjani Lal, Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran; Nusra Latif Qureshi, Sangeeta Sandrasegar, Adeela Suleman and TextaQueen.

Porosity Kabari
I am interested in the Australian philosophy of make do – to do your best with what you have. Jugaad is the Indian make do, with a slight twist. Jugaad is doing just enough with what you have, and it is also figuring it out as you go ~ improvising, rather than planning the direction forward. You can see this philosophy in action everywhere in India: From the way that people cross the street ~ stepping off the footpath and meandering through the traffic in whichever direction provides a free path; to high-rise construction ~ steel reinforcement protrudes from half built skyscrapers all over this country. It seems that these projects will be finished when there is the time and/or money to do so.

For me, the Chor Bazaar and Porosity Kabari are all about jugaad, and this has made me a little nervous. I am used to researching projects thoroughly and working through production processes in a very controlled manner, but with the design and production for Porosity Kabari happening in just three weeks, who has time for planning or control. Most days during this project we would head into the bazaar or Dharavi and observe the makers who work in these hubs of industry. We observed and then we reacted, generating ideas by improvising forms based on those that were possible, using the techniques and/or materials that we saw. We also improvised our way through the making process, as options, problems or questions arose, we suggested the best immediate solution that came to mind.

Dropping a Kumhar Wala Mudka
This project pays homage to Ai WeiWei’s controversial and innovative work ~ Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn. By destroying an object that physically embodies two thousand years of Chinese tradition, culture and history, WeiWei openly denounces the conventions that are used to legitimise centuries of indoctrination and malevolent actions, perpetrated by the Chinese establishment.

Dropping a Kumhar Wala Mudka offers a similar critique of the traditions and history that underpin Indian social conventions. In India, the Kumhar Wala (potter) is among the lower castes, meaning that these craftspeople, who make functional objects serving millions of Indians on a daily basis, do not earn the respect that they deserve for their role within Indian society. Kumhar Walas work extremely long hours, making thousands of thrown objects every day, and the remuneration received for their many hours of toil is no where near that of higher, more traditionally educated castes. The Kumhar Walas working in India are some of the most skilful clay throwers in the world, but they are not recognised for their skill and they do not receive the reverence that they deserve.

In this work, Abbas Galwani, a Kumhar Wala living and working in Dharavi, drops a traditional Indian Mudka. With this act, Abbas denounces the cultural structures that restrict his social mobility, impede his ability to gain renown for his unquestionable skill, and hinder his capacity to provide for his family.

If India (The Emerging Giant) is to reach its full potential, the working classes must be afforded a place of pride and equality within Indian society. A rising super-power, built on a foundation of resentment, inequality and exclusivity, will be forever undermined by unrest and discontent.

Only ten of these pieces were made, each coming with three framed black and white photographs of Abbas Galwani dropping his matka.

Jugaad with Car Parts
Jugaad With Car Parts began on one of our first days in the Chor Bazaar, when we came across groups of men completely disassembling cars. Embracing the spirit of jugaad, we asked some of those men if they would separate some of the car panels for us, and paid way too much for them to do so. Regardless, we left this corner of the bazaar with our first car panel, taking it across the Chor Bazaar to a small metal workshop that we had hoped would be interested in working with us.

As it turns out, the guys that we had in mind couldn’t have been less interested in experimenting with our ideas, and so we walked from workshop to workshop until we found someone who was willing to work with our simple cardboard model and cracked, old car panel.

Juzer and Abbas worked quickly and we soon jugaaded through a few different joining methods. The hand riveting used to make cookers in the Chor Bazaar turned out to be a beautifully unrefined option, and within a day we had our first set of prototypes.

A chance glimpse of some copper in one of the other workshops provided a new material to experiment with, and my favourite Jugaad With Car Parts combines a beautifully warn white car bonnet with copper panels and copper rivets.

Exhibition Curator
Rodney James

Where
Bunjil Place,
2 Patrick Northeast Drive,
Narre Warren, VIC

Exhibition dates
22 June – 22 September 2019

Supporters
Bunjil Place
UNSW Art & Design
Columbia University – Studio X
Parsons Mumbai

Image Credit – Neville Sukhia

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ ALCHEMYSTS

15 JUNE - 15 JULY 2019 ~ CAMBI, MILANO, ITALY

Valentina Ottobri has selected the Shaker Family Home for an exhibition at Cambi in Milan, Italy, bringing together a collection of contemporary and classic design works which address the subject of spirituality. Alchemysts is a curated collection of works whose authors have used their wit to give life to objects of divine and spiritual matter, becoming able to express themselves through universal topics, with strongly incisive and symbolic means.

The Shaker Family Home is a collection of work inspired by the austere religious and furniture making practices of the Shaker people, during the early 19thCentury. It is during this period that the Shaker religion was at its strongest, centred around New England, in the north-east of the United States. It was also in this era that the Shakers began to make the artefacts for which they are most renowned, their refined timber chairs, cabinets and objects for living, a pre-cursor to Modern design.

The Shakers see labour of all kinds as an act of prayer, as indicated by their central belief – “Hands to work, hearts to god”. As a result, they became dedicated furniture makers, devoting countless hours to this fastidious craft, and perfecting their skills and designs as a testament to god. The Shakers were also celibate, meaning that one could not be born a Shaker, but had to choose the religion. Members of the Shaker faith lived in isolated villages, occupying beautifully crafted houses as collections of disparate individuals who lived and worked together as families, referring to each other as sister, brother, mother and father, despite the absence of blood relation. At its peak, in the early to mid 19th Century, there were 6000 Shaker believers, but by the early 20th Century there were only 12 Shaker communities remaining in the United States and by 2017 only 2 Shakers remained in the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village in New Gloucester – Brother Arnold Hadd and Sister June Carpenter. As with all religions, believers came and went as their faith waxed and waned and their motivations evolved, an attrition that has meant the near extinction of this humble religion.

The Shaker Family Home is an homage to this way of life: Furniture design and making as an act of prayer; the fragility of faith; and the complexity of family in a community where no children are born. The cabinet in this family of objects represents the Shaker home, a structure that houses the family members in a series of drawers – the rooms of the house.

The members of the family are represented by a series of functional object, each living in its own drawer within the cabinet. No two objects are the same, tied together only by the Shaker sensibility that governs their design. As in Shaker communities, these objects can remain in the fold, functioning as part of the family unit, inside the cabinet. However, they are also free to leave the fold and function as autonomous objects outside of the cabinet, the family home, and the community.

The Shaker Family Home required a truly collaborative approach to design and making. The conception of this narrative driven furniture piece required a designer with a strong history of embodying story in physical form. The realisation of this family of objects required a maker whose skills and sensibilities were fully attuned to the complexity and fastidiousness of the Shaker approach to living, worshiping and making. The Shaker Family Home brings together Trent Jansen’s heavily research-led, anthropological design approach with Chris Nicholson’s sensitive understanding and recreation of Shaker theologies and making methodologies in a nuanced homage to the purity of the Shakers, their beliefs and their cabinetry.

Where
Cambi Milano,
Via San Marco 22,
Milano, Italy.

Exhibition dates
15 June – 15 July 2019

Supporters
Cambi
UNSW Art & Design

Image credit – Cambi and Romello Pereira

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ ROSSANA ORLANDI

9 - 14 APRIL 2019 ~ SALONE DEL MOBILE, MILANO, ITALY

For the Salone del Mobile in 2019, the Pankalangu Wardrobe from the Broached Monsters Collection was exhibited with Galleria Rossana Orlandi in Milano, Italy.

Australia was England’s last great conquest. With colonial possession came the right to imagine, in anticipation of populating the country, what amazing creatures resided there. Fabulous creatures of incredible proportions and improbable anatomy filled the void of knowledge.

Fear of imaginary creatures gained fuel when early British colonists had sustained contact with Indigenous Australians and learned of local folkloric creatures. In Australia’s unforgiving natural environment these monster stories served a purpose, to warn that the wilderness is not benign.

Early monster stories represent a point of cultural confluence for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. This is what attracts Trent Jansen to them, as the intersection of indigenous and non-indigenous narrative is a focal point of a design practice that aims to foster a new Australian culture of hybrid stories, informed by both Indigenous Australian and European traditions. Broached Commissions, Australia’s leading narrative driven design studio, has a long standing relationship with Trent Jansen and supported this show as it epitomised a shared interest in how the past informs the present.

Two creatures are represented in Broached MONSTERS: The Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay and the Pankalangu: Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay is an English myth formed after Captain Cook reported back to England of his brief experience of the Australian eastern coast, prior to British colonisation in 1788. Just as many convicts thought it was possible to walk from Sydney to China, and died trying, so too many arrived thinking a giant of nine feet tall, with a broad face, deathly eyes and a coat of long, sparse wiry hair was a real creature to be feared.

This Big Foot of the antipodes probably occupied the minds of many early settlers who tried to rest, surrounded by the sounds of animal stirrings in the pitch dark bush, on their first nights spent in the new colony.

Pankalangucomes from Arrernte Country in the Northern Territory of Australia. Trent Jansen was introduced to the story by Baden Williams, an Arrernte elder who assisted Trent in his research on Indigenous Australian mythical creatures. Pankalanguis one of three groups of creatures whom frequent Western Arrernte Country. He is a territorial being that lives in the scrub and is completely camouflaged in the desert and bush. Pankalangumoves with the rain, and is made visible when the water droplets falling over his body are caught by the light, defining his form in a glistening silhouette. Our Hairy Wild Man born from afar and the rain gliding Pankalanguare the two protagonist creatures of this Broached MONSTERS Collection, embraced to make sense of a hugely jarring collision between two cultures.

Words by Lou Weis.

Where
Galleria Rossana Orlandi,
Via Matteo Bandello 14,
Milano, Italy.

Exhibition dates
9 – 14 April 2019

Supporters
Galleria Rossana Orlandi
UNSW Art & Design
Broached Commissions

Image Credit – Michael Corridore

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ LOCAL MILAN No. 4

9 - 14 APRIL 2019 ~ 5VIE, SALONE DEL MOBILE, MILANO, ITALY

For the Salone del Mobile in 2019, the Shaker Family Home was exhibited with LOCAL DESIGN in Milano, Italy.

The Shaker Family Home is a collection of work inspired by the austere religious and furniture making practices of the Shaker people, during the early 19thCentury. It is during this period that the Shaker religion was at its strongest, centred around New England, in the north-east of the United States. It was also in this era that the Shakers began to make the artefacts for which they are most renowned, their refined timber chairs, cabinets and objects for living, a pre-cursor to Modern design.

The Shakers see labour of all kinds as an act of prayer, as indicated by their central belief – “Hands to work, hearts to god”. As a result, they became dedicated furniture makers, devoting countless hours to this fastidious craft, and perfecting their skills and designs as a testament to god. The Shakers were also celibate, meaning that one could not be born a Shaker, but had to choose the religion. Members of the Shaker faith lived in isolated villages, occupying beautifully crafted houses as collections of disparate individuals who lived and worked together as families, referring to each other as sister, brother, mother and father, despite the absence of blood relation. At its peak, in the early to mid 19th Century, there were 6000 Shaker believers, but by the early 20th Century there were only 12 Shaker communities remaining in the United States and by 2017 only 2 Shakers remained in the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village in New Gloucester – Brother Arnold Hadd and Sister June Carpenter. As with all religions, believers came and went as their faith waxed and waned and their motivations evolved, an attrition that has meant the near extinction of this humble religion.

The Shaker Family Home is an homage to this way of life: Furniture design and making as an act of prayer; the fragility of faith; and the complexity of family in a community where no children are born. The cabinet in this family of objects represents the Shaker home, a structure that houses the family members in a series of drawers – the rooms of the house.

The members of the family are represented by a series of functional object, each living in its own drawer within the cabinet. No two objects are the same, tied together only by the Shaker sensibility that governs their design. As in Shaker communities, these objects can remain in the fold, functioning as part of the family unit, inside the cabinet. However, they are also free to leave the fold and function as autonomous objects outside of the cabinet, the family home, and the community.

The Shaker Family Home required a truly collaborative approach to design and making. The conception of this narrative driven furniture piece required a designer with a strong history of embodying story in physical form. The realisation of this family of objects required a maker whose skills and sensibilities were fully attuned to the complexity and fastidiousness of the Shaker approach to living, worshiping and making. The Shaker Family Home brings together Trent Jansen’s heavily research-led, anthropological design approach with Chris Nicholson’s sensitive understanding and recreation of Shaker theologies and making methodologies in a nuanced homage to the purity of the Shakers, their beliefs and their cabinetry.

Where
LOCAL DESIGN presents,
LOCAL MILAN No.4 in 5Vie,
Via Cesare Correnti 14,
Milano, Italy.

Exhibition dates
9 – 14 April 2019

Supporters
LOCAL DESIGN
UNSW Art & Design
5VIE

Image credit – Romello Pereira

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ DESIGNBYTHEM

9 - 14 APRIL 2019 ~ STUDIO VIAFARINI, SALONE DEL MOBILE, MILANO, ITALY

For the Salone del Mobile in 2019, the Nuptial Pendants were exhibited with DesignByThem in Milano, Italy.

The Nuptial Pendants were designed as a sustainable piece of lighting, aiming to be involved in a lasting personal relationship with their owner, fostered by the human characteristics that this piece possesses. These pieces hope to play an important roll in the life of their owner, thus becoming sustainable instead of disposable.

The Nuptial Pendants were designed as an expression of the beautiful intimacy that exists between two people that have been together for a very long time. Like an elderly couple that have spent their lives together, just as in love as the day they met. When two people commit themselves to one another completely, this is a unique bond.

 

The Nuptial Pendants are two identical, cotton lampshades that appear to have been fused together as life-long companions.

Where
DesignByThem,
Studio Viafarini,
Via Carlo Farini 35,
Milano, Italy.

Exhibition dates
9 – 14 April 2019

Supporters
DesignByThem
UNSW Art & Design

Image credit – Alex Kershaw and Pete Daly

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ DESIGN STORYTELLERS : THE WORK OF BROACHED COMMISSIONS

16 AUGUST 2018 - 15 FEBRUARY 2019 ~ NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA

Founded in Melbourne in 2010, Broached Commissions is Australia’s most noted limited-edition design studio and leading international exponent of narrative based object design. The studio collaborates with Australian and international designers to produce furniture and objects that respond to context, history and mythology.

Since 2010 a broad array of projects have been developed for international exhibition or through direct commissions for leading architectural projects. In its own way, each project follows a research-led process – fusing cultural narrative and historical research with contemporary design. The outcome is work that combines legacy (political, social, industrial, material and formal) with contemporary functional and material expectations.

Comprising of works by Australian and international designers, including Trent Jansen, MAD Architects, Lucy McRae and Adam Goodrum, this exhibition, as the first Broached Commissions retrospective, brings together the most celebrated pieces across the studio’s output in addition to presenting newly realised commissions.

The exhibition, presented in the Design Studio at NGV Australia, offers a rich journey into the ideas and inspiration behind the works, providing a unique insight into a coming of age for Australian design, while examining the contemporary phenomena of collectable design-art realised through rich collaborations between contemporary designers, industry and craftspeople.

Broached Commissions was co-founded by Lou Weis & Vincent Aiello.

Included Works
Briggs Family Tea Service – 2011
Chinaman’s File Rocking Chair – 2013
Pankalangu Collection – 2017
Hairy Wild Man from Botany Bay Collection – 2017
Jangarra Armchair – 2017 – Designed in collaboration with Johnny Nargoodah and Rita Minga for Mangkaja Arts Centre and Fremantle Arts Centre

Where
NGV Australia
Federation Square, Ground Level,
Melbourne, VIC

Exhibition dates
17 August 2018 – 15 February 2019

Supporters
National Gallery of Victoria
Broached Commissions
UNSW Art & Design
Criteria

Image Credit – Michael Corridore, Scotty Cameron and Bo Wong

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ PANKALANGU CREDENZA WITH BROACHED COMMISSIONS & GALLERY ALL

5 - 9 DECEMBER 2018 ~ DESIGN MIAMI, MIAMI, USA

At Design Miami 2018 in Miami, USA, the newest work in the Broached Monsters Collection, the Pankalangu Credenza, was on show with Broached Commissions and Gallery All.

Prior to colonisation Australia was imagined, in the northern hemisphere, as a vast southern landmass … and little else was factually known. Fabulous creatures, of incredible proportions and improbable anatomy, filled the void of knowledge.

Fear of these creatures was legitimised when early British colonists started to learn of the frightful monsters in Aboriginal folklore. This fear of what lurked in the unknown fathoms of Australian bush land soon became a point of cultural confluence for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Over 5 years of research and design investigation Trent Jansen recreated two creatures that represent both Indigenous and non-Indigenous vernaculars – Pankalangu and the Hairy Wild Man From Botany Bay – suggesting these conflating myths as central figures for a national mythology that is inclusive of both cultures.

Broached Commissions was co-founded by Lou Weis & Vincent Aiello.

Where
Gallery All – Booth G31,
DesignMiami,
Meridian Avenue & 19th Street,
Miami Beach, USA

Exhibition dates
5 – 9 December 2018

Supporters
DesignMiami
Gallery All
Broached Commissions
UNSW Art & Design

Image Credit – Michael Corridore

RECENT EXHIBITION ~ PANKALANGU CREDENZA WITH BROACHED COMMISSIONS & GALLERY ALL

11 - 17 JUNE 2018 ~ DESIGN MIAMI/BASEL, BASEL, SWITZERLAND

At Design Miami/Basel 2018 in Basel, Switzerland, the newest work in the Broached Monsters Collection, the Pankalangu Credenza, was on show with Broached Commissions and Gallery All.

Prior to colonisation Australia was imagined, in the northern hemisphere, as a vast southern landmass … and little else was factually known. Fabulous creatures, of incredible proportions and improbable anatomy, filled the void of knowledge.

Fear of these creatures was legitimised when early British colonists started to learn of the frightful monsters in Aboriginal folklore. This fear of what lurked in the unknown fathoms of Australian bush land soon became a point of cultural confluence for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

Over 5 years of research and design investigation Trent Jansen recreated two creatures that represent both Indigenous and non-Indigenous vernaculars – Pankalangu and the Hairy Wild Man From Botany Bay – suggesting these conflating myths as central figures for a national mythology that is inclusive of both cultures.

Broached Commissions was co-founded by Lou Weis & Vincent Aiello.

Where
Gallery All – Booth G27,
DesignMiami/Basel,
Halle 1 Sud, Messe Basel,
Basel, Switzerland

Exhibition dates
11 – 17 June 2018

Supporters
DesignMiami/Basel
Gallery All
Broached Commissions
UNSW Art & Design

Image Credit – Michael Corridore